Things you've been puzzled about

The phrase does include non-menstrual products. For instance, douches. Even though douches make it more likely that you’ll get an infection so technically they’re the opposite of hygiene.

I didn’t think of that. To be honest though, it all feels a bit too… “let’s pretend this isn’t what we’re actually talking about” for my liking.

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I am a bit curious as to whether this is an issue driven by American / British prudishness. Can the commentators from other parts of the world advise if menstrual products go by a similar euphemism in your local languages?

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This is my own personal bias, but I think it’s more from American Puritans attiude vs European attitudes. I mean Europe has a ton of paintings and statues, which we can see “the girls” as some women like to call them,. One statue which comes to mind is “Venus De milo”. One painting I don’t remember the name, of but it’s also of the same goddess but by her other name, (oh right, it’s “Birth of Aphrodite”), and if we want to talk about a later paintings how about the French Revoulation painting- “Liberty Leading the people”?

Well most paintings of women in North America, , the women always seem to be covered up or acting like a mother in at least one painting.

Again it’s only my bias

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In Danish they’re called ‘hygiejnebind’, literally hygiene pads/binds/wraps (it’s kind of a catch-all word that way) with no mention of which gender they’re intended for. That’s just your standard pack of Always whatever, though. I don’t think I’ve ever heard a catch-all to include tampons, cups etc.

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In Swedish the general word would be “mensskydd” (“menstruation protection”), maybe there’s something of the kind in Danish :slight_smile:

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At the Poli Nations event, there were a few sculpted displayes,including a rather nice one for the rose. A number of the petals had inscriptions on them, and not all of them in English. Can anyone help with the translations, please?

The orange one says, “The fragrance always remains on the hand that gives the rose.” I don’t know about the other two.

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Not sure but they look to be Arabic and Chinese?

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I asked a friend of mine who studied Arabic. The one in the first picture is not actually Arabic. Not unless it’s about rice or inserting things. Butرز means rose in Persian and you can see it at the end of the first line (it’s right to left, so the left side), so I’m pretty sure it’s Persian.

Anyway, I copied it as best I could.
د ذيا گل رز ا ست ، آن ر ا دو کن و به د وستانت ببخش
After plugging it into Google Translate and cross-referencing Persian sayings, I believe the translation is this:
“The world is a rose, smell it and pass it on to your friend.”

As for the Chinese one, I have a friend who lived in China for a while and might be able to translate. They’re on a road trip right now and I don’t know when they’ll be back online. Probably about a month. If I remember, then I’ll ask them about it.

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Thank you so much!

Just done Google Lens Translate. It says the Chinese one means something like, “Observers should also know that there are prickles among them”.

I’d love to know how accurate that is!

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Thank you!