Surprising Story Receptions

Expect bafflement/what’s the story? in equal measures:,

An awful lot of assumptions need to be made to make this a story

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People are pointing out that just because he learned better (only after an employee who was actively quitting accepted his offer to talk on their way out), doesn’t excuse his shitty behaviour in the first place. There’s also some questioning about the validity of corporate’s complaints.

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https://notalwaysright.com/sometimes-we-wish-you-could-evict-neighbors/268414/

Comments seem to be more against 125 than I would have expected. Kinda suprised how comments are normally very against HOA cosmetic restrictions but seem onboard with cosmetic restrictions this time since they are government based.

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That’s what I’m finding odd. It feels like a nobody’s right thing here. 125 is being rude but it also sounds like the entire time they lived on that street, no one made an effort to get to know them or even befriend them. And if you’re making significant cosmetic changes to the front of your house, I understand why they’d be upset to not have any warning or permit notifications. Still, a HUGE brat move to report it and get the family in trouble without actually chatting with them. Not a text, an actual face-to-face convo.

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My nextdoor neighbour built a massive garage in their garden without planning permission and were reported by somebody which resulted in the council forcing him to tear it down. My family were arguably the only residents impacted because it blocked our view and light but it wasn’t us: we took the view that it was already well under development when we moved in so whilst it wasn’t ideal we felt it would be a bit crappy to complain about it. Obviously somebody else felt differently.

I do find the idea of HOAs utterly bizzare though. Given how fiercely personal freedom is defended in America the idea that people think they are entitled to a say on what colour a neighbour paints their door or whatever seems like a massive contradiction of that ethos.

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HOAs were literally created to get around anti-discrimination laws, as they usually rely on things like income level and credit scores as well as promises to adhere to a certain level of conformity which they can use to more subtly deny minorities residence in their neighborhoods.

I think this is a ESH: and if you live in a HOA, it’s a really dumb idea to do any kind of work like that without getting an all-clear.

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Robindaybird has the rights to it, it’s WAY more popular in the south, but now they’ve bled everywhere because people “claim” it helps keep the area clean, but in every single experience I’ve had with them, it really doesn’t make a difference at all. I get yelled at for leaving my trash cans out 2 hours too long, and yet this guy down the road had his privacy (6ft tall) fence just laying across his grass and on the sidewalk for nearly a year.

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There is apparently a clause in our title deed which prohibits residents in our estate from building a wall or fence around our respective properties - I have never wanted a fence more!

I keep getting story threads about HOAs on Facebook for some reason and man, they sound utterly toxic.

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  1. Permits are often required by governments to make sure that construction - even cosmetic - isn’t going to poorly affect something. For instance paving over your entire yard would be cosmetic, but also cause there to be poor water drainage.

  2. I think HOAs are stupid. That’s why I don’t live somewhere with an HOA. If you do, then you agreed to follow their rules. I encourage you to try to change those rules or get out of the HOA if possible, but if you’re going against the rules you agreed to follow I can’t be surprised when you get in trouble for it.

What’s funny is I supposedly live where there is an HOA, but I have no idea what their rules are or how to find them and only hear from them if they want to squeeze money out of me. if I need to ask a question, it’s all radio silence. for instance, my husband and I were considering getting a solar roof and tried to reach out to figure out if there were any rules about that, never heard back from them.

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Document the lack of responses and use them in court when you fight against any fines they attempt to issue.

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Rather apt title here:

When innocent people get caught up in revenge, stop.

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In fact, The_Red_Pen asked us whether this was more NaR or NaW some time back.

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Thankyou! I was doing my nut trying to find where I’d read it before :slight_smile:

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Don’t think OP was expecting to be called out for being judgmental by the majority of the commenters

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Usually the comments would have the “one of today’s 10 000” comic featured, but in this case it’s already flooded with answers to OP’s question: “They don’t have burgers made with beef in India. That’s how.”
Chicken burgers are the standard in India, and I think even the Big Mac is either chicken based or plant based. It’s still a famous “American-style burger” but not beef. If they don’t know about cultural norms, then they pick a familiar sandwich and get startled the local menu don’t have the same recipes

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I know it’s not the point, or that it’s likely that the OP doesn’t recall perfectly, but I’m bemused that the Indian family, even when accustomed to either eat or see other people eat chicken or mutton, still treat beef as the “default” meat. It’s the kind of thing you’d expect to be different, y’know?

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Just got pinged to this one.

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The sale of beef in any form is illegal in many states here in India, and otherwise frowned upon wherever it is legal. McD and other burger chains explicitly mention they don’t sell any beef products at all. In fact, it is probably only India where vegetarian and meat production lines are independent of each other in the restaurants’ kitchens.

For the Big Mac Index, the Maharaja Mac, a commonly sold large chicken burger is used.

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Even otherwise meat-eating families in India do not eat beef for religious reasons. Chicken, mutton, bacon is all fine, beef is not. ‘Meat’, if unspecified, is meant to be chicken. And they are very sensitive about that.

The standard ‘cheese sandwich’ in India is basically plain old cheese on plain old bread. Assuming that a cheeseburger is just the burger bread version of that isn’t far off, given local cultural norms. People who’ve been around cheeseburgers previously have had to often advise visitors and recent arrivals to cheeseburgerland about beef being the standard meat, and not chicken like it is in India.

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