Really want a dog but I'm allergic

I even took one of those allergy tests where they prick your skin with a bunch of tiny needles, and I’m about a 3 out of 4 in severity when it comes to dogs.
It seems like there are no breeds that are 100% hypoallergenic? I’ve been around supposedly hypoallergenic breeds and I still feel my allergies act up.

Anyone who is allergic but has a dog anyway? Do you find your allergies go away over time? What steps did you take to get over them?

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Hate to say it, but allergies are really unpredictable. They sometimes get better with repeated exposure. Other times, they get worse. And you would be gambling not only with your own well-being, but with the poor dog’s, who might bond to a new home and human, then lose them for reasons he can’t understand.

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I have family who have lessened other allergies like house dust and pollen with regular treatments, going to the doctor every couple weeks for like a year or more. It’s a big commitment but if you really want a dog it might be worth it. I hear poodles are hypoallergenic but nothing is 100%, and I heard it even varies by dog lineage (some poodles are more allergy-triggering than others).

That straight up sucks though. Maybe you can befriend a neighbor or friend with a dog?

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This makes a lot of sense. It’s also the part of the reason why I haven’t gotten one.

I do have some friends who seemingly have “gotten over it” over time by just having a dog around. Just a bit envious I guess. But I get your point and I wouldn’t want that for the dog if it came down to it.

I’ve definitely befriended friends/neighbors’ dogs, I can pet them (with some distance) but as soon as any of the dander goes to my face or I inhale some, I’m done for lol. Not necessarily severe enough for anaphylaxis but enough to take me out for a day at least.
Love big dogs too, and those are the worst for me.

But how can you not hug them sometimes :pleading_face:

Also, that sounds like an immunization thing where they vaccinate you regularly to build up your tolerance. I tried that for a year, but stopped (should have kept going). I remember the doc saying I’d have to be on it for 5+ years.

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Five years to get the point where you can pet a doggie? Worth it. :stuck_out_tongue:

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Oof that’s a long time. I would be frustrated too! There’s no promises with these things but if cost and time aren’t factors I think it’s worth it. Think of it like starting a diet or a home renovation or similar big project. Is there a point after a few years where you could develop enough immunity for a hypoallergenic dog, like a compromise point (idk how it works)?

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This is the way – you’d need to stay on with an immunologist that you trust for a while. I went through an allergy shot regimen as a child for…maybe 8 years? Outside of this-or-that odd medication, I effectively don’t have allergies any longer.

But @divgradcurl has the right of it, too: everyone’s case is unique.

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I agree with killertomato… 5 years to build up a tolerance so you can pet and hug a dog seems worth it to me.

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There are other animals. A small pig is a possibility - they’re smart and can be trained - but some drawbacks are listed at https://spca.bc.ca/news/mini-pigs/ As for the household odour, I expect the pig would get used to it. :slight_smile: