Next book topic - printer ink or e-ink? That is the question

For most of my life, I have described myself as a bookworm. Then, in 2008, I found myself in the position of having to downsize my living space. At about the same time, I learned about the Amazon Kindle. I happened to have a few extra bucks in the bank, so I ordered one.

It honestly improved my life.

I realized I am not a BOOKworm, I am a WORDworm. I do not miss the feel and smell of paper books at all. I have been able to donate 11 of those 30-gallon black plastic trash bags full of books just from the shelves in the dining room. I stopped counting at that point.

There are some paper books I have kept. Those were gifts, autographed copies or books like Pete Souza’s book about Obama, which is almost entirely photographs.

Why do I prefer to do my reading (usually several hours a day) on my Kindle? A few reasons:

I can enlarge the font if it’s late and my eyes are tired. With a Kindle, any book can be a large print edition.

Many of the books I have were free. Books like the complete Shakespeare, complete Jane Austen, complete Sherlock Holmes and so many more, all free. (Where were they when I was in college majoring in English?!)

I can carry all of the above books, and a whole lot more, around in my purse.

If I’m reading in bed, and finish a book, I can turn on my hot spot, download the next book in the series, and be reading again in about a minute, even if it’s 2:am.

My sister, who shares my Amazon account, can be reading the same book simultaneously, even in different locations.

The news is filled with stories of fires, hurricanes, floods and all manner of other natural disasters. These things destroy paper books, and the cost of replacing them would be horrible, especially since so many other things would need replacement first. All I would need to do is order a new Kindle (if mine had been destroyed), and all my books would be there ready for me to download.

So those are a few of my reasons for preferring my Kindle to paper books. How about the rest of you? Which do you like? Why?

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I read either. Sometimes I just want a printed book and other times I like the convenience and portability of my Kindle. But no matter where I go I have both options. I always have an old fashioned book with me in my bag.

I used to do that, too, but good old Murphy’s Law dictated that book would end at least 20 minutes shorter than the time I needed to fill.

Paper books for me. Cost of a kindle (or alternative e-reader) is a factor. Also a lot of books I’d want to read are highly unlikely to be free. I have been buying a few second-hand books on ebay too.

Also, I’m a big fan of manga. No point in kindlising that. I may as well just read that free online if that’s the case.

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Both? Both is good.
I initially liked the Kindle a lot, for all the reasons you mentioned.
However, being on my second one, I’ve discovered the display loses its definition a lot faster than I’d like, so it becomes more tiresome to read than a good ol’ paper book. And I do like actually holding a book in my hands, and I never really got the hang of knowing where I am on the e-book on Kindle (the position markers or something often count author’s notes or translation notes in the end, and page counts change if you change font size).
So, when my current Kindle finally gives out, I will probably not buy a new device, but I’ll keep reading e-books through their app, in my phone or a tablet.

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I live in a non-English speaking country so my e-reader is a godsend and the main way I keep up with my favorite books!!
I also have many paper books but they are a friggin hassle to move, man.

It is interesting how much has changed over the last decade. I used to have a Nook but then Barnes & Noble (or was it Borders?) went bankrupt, so I switched to Kindle. I don’t love chipping in to Bezos’ space flight fund but the massive library and international access just can’t be beat. The Nook didn’t work unless you had a US address, not sure about stores for Kobo, or for people in countries without a designated Amazon store.

I use both!

Living on a boat, space is limited, so a kindle is perfect. I have to read a lot of classics for my uni courses, they’re usually free and I don’t have to wait for weeks for delivery.

I do prefer paper books though, there are usually book exchanges in marinas, I take whatever I can read (languagewise) and leave the books I’ve read already :slight_smile:

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It was B&N, and I was delighted when they went under. They were the ones who either bought out or forced out most of the wonderful independent bookstores where I lived, before Amazon even existed.

As for Bezos, I’m not thrilled with everything he does, but any man who gives Chef Andres $100 million can’t be all bad.

I mean if you’re unhappy about big business destroying small independent stores, doesn’t get worse than Amazon.

That’s not the primary concern for me when I shop for books but I understand why it is for others. Unfortunately it’s harder and harder to be a small business in many markets…

A little late, but for me, this is no question. Real ink. Mostly bought in brick and mortar shops, or secondhand online. New books I almost never buy online.