My new colleague

So, I just started a new job yesterday as a nurse on an OB/GYN ward. The main focus is postpartum care, but there are a few patients with gyn-issues as well. A regular pregnancy is not an illness, most of the patients are young and healthy, they stay there for 2 days until they can leave with their kids.

This has lead to that the staff has sort of forgotten what it is to treat ill patients (in my eyes at least). The colleague I was working with seemed to have a huge issue with psychiatric disorders.

One of the patients was transferred to the ward from the psychiatric ward a few days, she is anorectic. She got transferred back yesterday during my shift and as she left, my colleague called “Gain some weight” at her. I was appalled. It’s like telling an alcoholic “Just stop drinking” or a couple having problems getting pregnant to “just shag more”.

Unfortunetely, because it was my first day, I didn’t feel comfortable to say something about it :frowning:

Later that day, a woman was admitted for a gyn-issue. She’s schizophrenic. My colleague made a big fuss about it, acting like the woman was a bomb waiting to blow. The patient was medicated, orientied and made a stable impression. No need to panic, really. The colleague was obviously peeved by it, and talked loudly so that the patient could hear, about how she seemed sane at the moment “But you never know with them”. At least I had the guts to say something here, I mentioned how it wasn’t an issue, that the woman was well managed and that there was no need to make her schizophrenia into a huge deal, especially since she was admitted because of ovarian cysts.

Well. Day one was interesting at least…

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wow, seems like a problematic workplace, or at least colleague. Good luck with that!
I’d say that this really is worth bringing up with someone, because these things, said by professionals, can do really bad things to the patients.

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Ooh, that’s a bad nurse! It never has a good effect on healthcare when professionals compartmentalize too much and don’t want to learn how to deal with issues that are not within their specialty. Guess what, humans can have several things in different “systems” going on at the same time!

I think you could bring it up with your boss, supervisor, head nurse, someone like that. Not necessarily focusing on this coworker, but framing it as “how do we as a team deal with patients with non-gyno issues”.

Good luck with the new job!

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Does that specific ward have a social media presence? Maybe your patients might like to post something to your ward’s Facebook or Twitter page?