Minefield Quiz... The Secrets!

Can you find where I hid the clues for the mines in each game?

For now, send your answers by private message to me. If after a day or so there are still some that haven’t been found, I’ll open it up to allow collaboration on this thread.

Game 1

Q1 Tokyo is the capital city of which country?

Q2 How many James Bond films did Pierce Brosnan appear in?

Q3 Real name Sidney, briefly named Arnold, sometimes performs as Alastair and originally called “Wheel-Stealer” in an unaired advert, what name is this much loved character most commonly known by?

Q4 Every one of the first twenty-two films in the Pixar series included which actor?

Q5 Egypt is famous for its pyramids, but which country has the most?

Q6 England, Wales and which country make up Great Britain?

Q7 If I had Coulrophobia, what would I not want to see?

Q8 “Gee, Officer Krupke” is a song from which musical?

Q9 How many moons does Mars have?

Q10 The following are connected somehow: what is the connection? The second studio album by serpentwithfeet; the month which has the modern Zodiac signs of Taurus and Gemini; the ultimate destination of the MESSENGER probe; the singer who has a Blank Space and has to Shake It Off.

Answers

A1 Japan

A2 Four

A3 Cookie Monster

A4 John Ratzenburger

A5 Sudan

A6 Scotland

A7 Clowns

A8 West Side Story

A9 Two

A10 They are the surnames of the classic Queen band members: Deacon, May, Mercury and Taylor (Swift)

Questions 3 and 8 were mined

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Game 2

Q1 What 1968 film (based on a story by Ian Fleming) had Gert Frobe as the villain, as well as an appearance by Desmond Llewelyn (who provided the lead with the film’s famous car)?

Q2 Who wrote a story to win a bet, the bet being to write a story using no more than 50 words, which became one of the best selling English language stories ever written?

Q3 What do Richard Bachmann, John Beynon and Robert Galbraith all have in common?

Q4 What type of animal was the first creature intentionally sent into space?

Q5 What was found in Ljubljana Marshes in 2002 that is (as of April 2022) the oldest of its kind ever found?

Q6 Who designed the Chupa Chups logo?

Q7 What is the name of the island (that is also known as Hub Island) that was bought by the Sizeland family in the 1950s?

Q8 What was the first webcam set up for?

Q9 What did the Commette family, when they returned from holiday, find had hit their house whilst they were away?

Q10 What do the following have in common: the elf member of the Fellowship of the Ring; the planet you’re standing on right now; the English Actress who advertised BT for many years as the character Beatrice Bellman; the first astronaut to walk on the Moon

A1 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

A2 Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel), and the book was Green Eggs and Ham.

A3 They are all pen names of famous authors (Stephen King, John Wyndham and J K Rowling respectively)

A4 The common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

A5 A wooden wheel

A6 Salvador Dali

A7 Just Room Enough Island.

A8 Monitoring a coffee percolator at the University of Cambridge.

A9 A meteorite.

A10 The names all contain body parts: LEGolas, the EARth, Maureen LIPman and Neil ARMstrong

Questions 2 and 6 were mined

Game 3

Q1 Brad Dourif’s debut film role earned him a BAFTA and Golden Globe, as well as an Oscar nomination. What was the film?

Q2 Which song, written by Prince, was performed by Sinéad O’Connor on her second album I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got?

Q3 What are the only members of the genus Bradypus?

Q4 Who wrote the novel The Fourth Protocol, which was later turned into a film starring Michael Caine and Pierce Brosnon?

Q5 In Ten-pin bowling, how many pins in total will you have knocked down if you have scored a spare?

Q6 The Australian flag and the Kosovo flag have something altogether stellar in common… what is it?

Q7 Who are the Seven Dwarfs in the 1937 Walt Disney classic film?

Q8 If a Bingo Caller shouted “One Fat Lady” or “Garden Gate”, what number would they mean?

Q9 How is the rapper Derrick Keyes better known?

Q10: How are the following names connected? The calendar named for Julius Caesar; the character played by Burt Ward to Adam West’s Bruce Wayne; the jungle character that really should watch out for that tree; the young diarist who hid with her family in the Achterhuis; the electric wheelchair user who first appeared in the South Park episode The Tooth Fairy’s Tats.

A1 One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest

A2 Nothing Compares 2 U

A3 Three Toed Sloth

A4 Frederick Forsyth

A5 Ten

A6 Both have six stars

A7 Bashful, Doc, Dopey, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy and Sneezy

A8 Eight

A9 Nine (also 9MM and Nine Double M)

A10 Julian, Dick (Grayson), George, Anne (Frank) and Timmy (Burch) are the characters who make up Enid Blyton’s Famous Five

Questions 5 and 10 were mined. Well done to @RebeccaBlue, @AthenaCat and @Sillsallad who solved this one!

Game 4

Q1 N is the chemical symbol of which element?

Q2 If you take a correctly solved classic Sudoku puzzle, and turn the top line into a nine digit number, what is the probability that this very big number will be a prime?

Q3 Niall, Liam, Zayn, Louis, and Harry are the first names of which former boy band?

Q4 Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a fictional character in which series of books and films?

Q5 Times New Roman, Helvetica and Courier are all examples of what?

Q6 The inosilicate mineral, with the chemical composition (Mg,Fe2+)2(Mg,Fe2+)5Si8O22(OH)2 and was first discovered in Massachusetts in 1824, is called what?

Q7 How long did King Louis XIX rule over France for?

Q8 Rebecca, the novel by Daphne du Maurier, was made into a film in 1940. Who directed it?

Q9 “Every Good Boy Deserves Food” is a mnemonic used to remember what?

Q10 Each of the following (plus lots more besides) got some extra focus in September 1989. Why? The Democrat and Republican presidential candidates in the 1960 US General Election; the first artificial satellite launched into space; the author of Doctor Zhivago; that famous cinematic chariot race from 1959.

A1 Nitrogen

A2 0% - each 9 digit number you find will be divisible by 9, because all of the digits in the number, when added together, make a number divisible by 9. A fun fact for you all!

A3 One Direction

A4 James Bond

A5 Typeface (although I did accept font)

A6 Cummingtonite

A7 A bit under 20 minutes

A8 Alfred Hitchcock

A9 The notes on the lines of the treble clef.

A10 John F Kennedy and Richard Nixon, Sputnik, Boris Pasternak and Ben Hur all feature in Billy Joel’s 1989 hit We Didn’t Start the Fire.

Questions 2 and 7 were mined.

Game 5

Q1 The 1912 Summer Olympics in Sweden saw roughly half of the competitors drop out of the men’s marathon due to the heat. Ken McArthur of South Africa set an Olympic record of 2 hours, 36 minutes, 54.8 seconds. But who came 36th, and how long did he take?

Q2 Who composed the song “Bad Sign, Good Sign”? It includes the lyrics “I was born with this unlucky sneeze, And what is worse I came into the world the wrong way round. Pundits all agree that I’m the reason why, My father fell into the village pond, And drowned.”

Q3 A wildlife technician, Richard Thomas, calculated the answer to be "700 pounds on a good day with the wind at his back″, but what was the question?

Q4 Andre Geim won the Nobel prize in Physics for his research into graphene. But what did he win the Ig Nobel prize in 2000 for?

Q5 Who was the Roman Goddess of Wisdom who is said to have invented the flute?

Q6 I was born in Sweden in 1957. I am fluent in Swedish and English, and I can also speak some French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish. I hold a Masters in Chemical Engineering. Oh, and I did get into a fight with Sylvester Stallone. Who am I?

Q7 What 1988 song starts with a guitar exercise created by Saul Hudson, ends with lyrics that show the singer had no idea what to do next and ultimately topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart, giving the band their only US number 1 single?

Q8 What feat of cinematography did the 2002 Russian historical drama film Russian Ark and the 2013 Iranian slasher film Fish & Cat achieve that films like the 1948 Hitchcock crime thriller Rope and the 2010 Uruguayan horror film La Casa Muda simulated?

Q9 Mersenne prime numbers are used in cryptography. In 1996, George Woltman founded a collaborative project researching these numbers. What was this project called?

Q10 What do the following have in common? A sport with 18 holes; a landform created by sediment deposited at a river opening; upcoming MCU series on Disney+ starring Alaqua Cox; the electromagnetic radiation studied extensively by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen that earned him the Nobel Prize in physics in 1901.

A1 Shizo Kanakuri of Japan, in 54 years 246 days 5 hours 32 minutes 20.3 seconds

A2 Monty Norman

A3 How much would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck would chuck wood?

A4 He levitated a frog with magnets.

A5 Minerva

A6 Dolph Lundgren

A7 Sweet Child o’ Mine by Guns N’ Roses.

A8 The films were shot in a single continuous take.

A9 Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (aka G.I.M.P.S.)

A10 Golf, Delta, Echo and X-Ray are all used in the International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, more commonly known as the NATO phonetic alphabet, NATO spelling alphabet, ICAO phonetic alphabet or ICAO spelling alphabet

Questions 5 and 7 were mined.

Game 6

Q1 Krung Thep Maha Nakhon is the official name for the capital city of which country?

Q2 In the 1969 Eurovision Song Contest, a number of entries came joint first. What were the winning entries for Spain, Netherlands and France?

Q3 What began in 2001 at Halberstadt Cathedral in Germany, and should be completed in 2640?

Q4 If 2017 was “I’m not a fan of the new pound coin, but then again, I hate all change” and 2018 was “Working at the Jobcentre has to be a tense job – knowing that if you get fired, you still have to come in the next day”, what was 2019?

Q5 In 1958, 17 year old Robert G Heft designed something for a school project that earned him a B-, but the grade was changed to an A after President Eisenhower contacted the school about the design. What was the design?

Q6 Who won four consecutive terms of mayor in Cormorant Township, Minnesota (starting in 2014)?

Q7 Tony Hawks challenged the Moldovan football team to… what?

Q8 What did Claudio Daniel Troglia and Carmela Vitale both invent and receive patents for that made life that little bit easier for takeaway diners?

Q9 An accident resulted in a young Matt Murdock being blinded but gaining incredible abilities; this was Daredevil’s origin story. According to Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird in their comic book series, which team was created by the same accident?

Q10 What do the following have in common: The Roman goddess of marriage (Greek equivalent of Hera); the thoroughbred horse that in 1935 was the third winner of the American Triple Crown; the precious metal that iron pyrite is often confused for; the US state where you might find a famous 3D computer-generated teapot (designed by Martin Newell); what Excalibur is an example of.

A1 Thailand

A2 Spain: Salomé sang “Vivo cantando”; Netherlands: Lenny Kuhr sang “De troubadour”; France: Frida Boccara sang “Un jour, un enfant”

A3 A performance of John Cage’s As Slow as Possible.

A4 “I keep randomly shouting out ‘Broccoli’ and ‘Cauliflower’ – I think I might have florets”.

A5 The current flag of the United States, with 50 stars on it.

A6 Duke, a Great Pyrenees dog.

A7 Tennis.

A8 That little plastic table that stops the lid of the box from getting in your pizza.

A9 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. In case you hadn’t spotted the parallels between Daredevil and TMNT before, Daredevil’s mentor was Stick; the turtles had Splinter. Daredevil fights The Hand, and the turtles fight the Foot Clan.

A10 Juno, Omaha, Gold, Utah and Sword are the code names of the beaches used for the D-Day landings as part of Operation Overlord

Questions 1 and 2 were mined. Congratulations on @Sillsallad and @AthenaCat for solving this one!

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Game 7

Q1 Which musician, born 24th August 1948, was the first western musician to be officially invited to perform in the People’s Republic of China, which resulted in a series of concerts in October and November 1981?

Q2 The pie chart was first known to be used by William Playfair in 1801, but it wasn’t until the style was changed to make it more readable that it became more widely used. Who made these changes?

Q3 Known as the Father of the Modern Olympics, Pierre de Coubertin won a gold medal in the 1912 Summer Olympics (under a pseudonym). What was the gold medal for?

Q4 Which actor, who won an Academy Award for best actor for his role in Leaving Las Vegas, is such a huge fan of Superman that he named his son Jor-El (after Superman’s father)?

Q5 The 1974 Eurovision Song Contest, held in the United Kingdom, was arguably what started Abba’s rise to international fame when they represented Sweden with the song Waterloo. Portugal’s entry, performed by Paulo de Carvalho “E depois do adeus” (“And After the Farewell”), started something too, when it was broadcast on the 24th April 1974. What was it?

Q6 In the UK Top 20 charts for the week 17th to 23rd June 1955, Stranger in Paradise held three spots. That might sound impressive, but another song did even better… what song was that?

Q7 The 1989 film The Woman in Black starred Adrian Rawlins as Arthur. In the 2012 version , Arthur was played by Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe. Adrian Rawlins also appeared in the Harry Potter film series; which part did he play?

Q8 Which Austrian born actress developed frequency hopping technology to prevent US submarine torpedoes from being jammed?

Q9 Which US president, born in 1831 and took office in 1881, developed a new proof of the Pythagorean theorem, which he published in 1876?

Q10 What group can be made from the following: The UK television channel that first broadcast Taskmaster; the person who voiced Lando Calrissian in the LEGO Star Wars Holiday Special; the Dutch geologist who discovered an abundance of copper ore in a mountain that he called Ertsberg ; the Captain, created by Jeremy Lloyd, whose band of friends include Timid Toad, Reckless Rat, Artful Owl and Catty Cat; The co-presenter who, along with Sam Fox, helped to make the 1989 Brit Awards a memorable event, albeit for all the wrong reasons; the nickname of Trevor Richard Moore, the South African professional golfer.

A1 Jean-Michel Jarre

A2 Florence Nightingale

A3 Gold medal for literature (for his poem Ode to Sport; he wrote it under the pseudonym of Georges Hohrod and M. Eschbach)

A4 Nicolas Cage

A5 The song’s broadcast was used to start a revolution in Portugal. This revolution, later known as the Carnation Revolution, saw the overthrow of the Estado Novo regime and the bringing of democracy to Portugal. The revolution was over in only a few hours.

A6 Unchained Melody.

A7 James Potter, Harry’s father.

A8 Hedy Lamarr (born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler).

A9 James A. Garfield

A10 DAVE, Billy DEE Williams, Jean Jaques DOZY, BEAKY, MICK Fleetwood and TITCH: The words that are all in capital letters make up the music group Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich.

Questions 4 and 10 were mined. As was revealed at the end of Game 7, questions 4 and 10 contained factually incorrect information; the real questions without false information was provided when the mines were defused. Congratulations to @AthenaCat for getting this one!

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If anyone would like a hint, feel free to ask.

I think i will offer hints as to where you need to look for the clues.

The clues are hidden in the questions: games 1, 2 and 4

The clues are hidden in the answers: games 5 and 6

The clues are hidden across the questions and answers: game 3

A little update on secret hunting:

@RebeccaBlue has found the clue for game 2, and @AthenaCat spotted how the mines were concealed in game 5.

Just games 1 and 4 have yet to have their secrets revealed. There is a word that will help you, but if you have never heard this word before, you might think it’s another way of saying An Angry Flea

Edited (thanks, @AthenaCat)

Does anyone know what this person is holding?

Drop the “L” and say the two words out loud. Does that sound like a different word?

I found the clues in game 1 but not in 3 yet.

2 Likes

Oh goddammit that one is so obvious in hindsight

1 Like

I think you meant 1 and 4

1 Like

For 3, look at the answers

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Sorry, yes… i meant 4 not 3. Edited!

I think it’s time for open collaboration now.

It sounds like most of the clues have been found by at least one person. Has anyone found the one for four yet?

I’ll leave this one last day, then tomorrow I’ll post all the secrets and launch the final Minefield Quiz

The Secrets Revealed:

Game 1

Hidden by acrostic: the first letter of every question spells THREE and EIGHT

Q1 Tokyo is the capital city of which country?

Q2 How many James Bond films did Pierce Brosnan appear in?

Q3 Real name Sidney, briefly named Arnold, sometimes performs as Alastair and originally called “Wheel-Stealer” in an unaired advert, what name is this much loved character most commonly known by?

Q4 Every one of the first twenty-two films in the Pixar series included which actor?

Q5 Egypt is famous for its pyramids, but which country has the most?

Q6 England, Wales and which country make up Great Britain?

Q7 If I had Coulrophobia, what would I not want to see?

Q8 “Gee, Officer Krupke” is a song from which musical?

Q9 How many moons does Mars have?

Q10 The following are connected somehow: what is the connection? The second studio album by serpentwithfeet; the month which has the modern Zodiac signs of Taurus and Gemini; the ultimate destination of the MESSENGER probe; the singer who has a Blank Space and has to Shake It Off.

Game 2

Every question starts with the word WHAT, apart from the two mined questions, which start with WHO

Q1 What 1968 film (based on a story by Ian Fleming) had Gert Frobe as the villain, as well as an appearance by Desmond Llewelyn (who provided the lead with the film’s famous car)?

Q2 Who wrote a story to win a bet, the bet being to write a story using no more than 50 words, which became one of the best selling English language stories ever written?

Q3 What do Richard Bachmann, John Beynon and Robert Galbraith all have in common?

Q4 What type of animal was the first creature intentionally sent into space?

Q5 What was found in Ljubljana Marshes in 2002 that is (as of April 2022) the oldest of its kind ever found?

Q6 Who designed the Chupa Chups logo?

Q7 What is the name of the island (that is also known as Hub Island) that was bought by the Sizeland family in the 1950s?

Q8 What was the first webcam set up for?

Q9 What did the Commette family, when they returned from holiday, find had hit their house whilst they were away?

Q10 What do the following have in common: the elf member of the Fellowship of the Ring; the planet you’re standing on right now; the English Actress who advertised BT for many years as the character Beatrice Bellman; the first astronaut to walk on the Moon

Game 3

Every question and/or answer refers to a number. If the number matched the question number, it was safe. Question 5 had Ten, and Question 10 had Five; they were the mines.

Game 4

An acrostic was used, like game 1, except it spelled a maths question:

Q1 N is the chemical symbol of which element?

Q2 If you take a correctly solved classic Sudoku puzzle, and turn the top line into a nine digit number, what is the probability that this very big number will be a prime?

Q3 Niall, Liam, Zayn, Louis, and Harry are the first names of which former boy band?

Q4 Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a fictional character in which series of books and films?

Q5 Times New Roman, Helvetica and Courier are all examples of what?

Q6 The inosilicate mineral, with the chemical composition (Mg,Fe2+)2(Mg,Fe2+)5Si8O22(OH)2 and was first discovered in Massachusetts in 1824, is called what?

Q7 How long did King Louis XIX rule over France for?

Q8 Rebecca, the novel by Daphne du Maurier, was made into a film in 1940. Who directed it?

Q9 “Every Good Boy Deserves Food” is a mnemonic used to remember what?

Q10 Each of the following (plus lots more besides) got some extra focus in September 1989. Why? The Democrat and Republican presidential candidates in the 1960 US General Election; the first artificial satellite launched into space; the author of Doctor Zhivago; that famous cinematic chariot race from 1959.

NINE TIMES THREE is 27. The mines were 2 and 7

Game 5

The word “Mine” was contained in the answers: Minerva and Sweet Child O’Mine

Game 6

When you look up “Krung Thep Maha Nakhon” you should see that it is best known to the rest of the world as BANGkok.

With the Eurovision tied countries, I asked you to name songs of three specific countries. There was a fourth country that tied: UK with BOOM BANG a BANG