Does it matter that the family in this story is Islamic?

Want to get your opinions on this!

I have a story where it’s mentioned that a family at a theme park are Islamic. It’s not stated how the OP knows this, but I am guessing there are certain clothing indicators so identifying a religion based on that is fine.

The story then goes on to state that the father of the family refuses to be served by a woman. It is now clear that the OP has stated this sexism might be due to the religion of the customer.

Does it add context to keep this detail in, or is it adding a detail that might derail the story?

What do you all think?

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I think it would be helpful to see the whole story.

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Yeah, no way to tell without reading the entire story.

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Story:

Theme Park

Location:
Tennessee, US

Quote:
I work in a department that goes around the entire park helping disabled guests with their experience and letting them know what’s safe to ride and do. This particular instance there was a Islamic family waiting for me at a ride.

Me: walking up to ride looking for the guest that called, when I spotted them I went right up Hi there, how can I help you guys today?
Male Guest: No, no, I’m not speaking to a woman. Get me a man so that he can help me.
Me: I’m sorry? I’m the only person that’s able to do calls right now, you’ll have to wait for about an hour before my male coworker is finished with their break.
Male Guest: Then I want your manager to come.
Me: stifling a giggle because my only manager available was female Sure I’ll get them.

A few minutes later my FEMALE manager comes up to help the gentleman.

Manager: What seems to be the issue?
Male Guest: Are you telling me that there are no men that can help me? I refuse to speak to a woman!
Manager: Well, unfortunately you will not be getting any help from our team today. Have a nice day.

The guest went to another ride and called again. When I went to the call he got angrier and finally left the property, leaving a nasty review, about how women shouldn’t be our only people answering calls, with our service desk

A devout Muslim family lived in the apartment below the one I used to own. They were a little inconsiderate with the shared spaces and very loud so I had to speak to them a few times and the Mum wasn’t able to speak directly to me, the conversation was relayed through their young son (it definitely wasn’t a language barrier because she would speak directly to my wife) but her husband was able to speak to my wife.

Unfortunately I don’t know enough about Islam to know if that experience is representative of normal rules but its my only point of comparison.

I would strongly suggest researching this before going onto post. If he was just sexist then their religion is irrelevant. If the interaction was forbidden in some way then the story could be something of a powderkeg.

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Tricky one. On the whole, i would leave it out. His misogyny might be because of how he was brought up, in which case his background could well be a factor. But it might not have anything to do with that and he came up with his a-holeness all on his own.

If you were to include it, then the trolls might start crawling out from under their bridges; I’ve noticed that frequently in stories with minority groups.

As a general rule of thumb, i would suggest that if someone’s religion is definitely part of the story, then leave it in. Otherwise, best not mention it.

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Would you choose to leave it in if the family were Hasidic Jews? If yes, why do you want to remove it because they’re Islamic? If no, then remove it.

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I’d leave it out. As we have seen there are misogynists in all walks of life. And the person is also making an assumption on their religion.

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I’d skip the story altogether. It plays into racial stereotypes in a way that fake anti-muslim stories often do and honestly it’s not much of a story anyway. It’s too low on details to be interesting and just badly written.

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I know this was just a TV show. But there was a Canadian TV show (2007-2012) called Little Mosque on the Prairie" about a community of Muslims in a fictional town in Saskatchewan. Two of the Muslims in the show grew up with the kind of strict conservative upbringing we associated with Muslim community.

In one eposide of Season 1 of the show. The one Muslim male character (out of 3) wanted to put a wall between the man’s and women’s pray areas in the their mosque which was in the basement of a church. In the same episode he and his daughter (whom he has custody of) are battling over the daughter should be wearing a hijab due to her “being a woman” now while the daughter wants to me a modern woman and not wear a hijab.

In another episode, a Muslim woman whom runs I think it was a cafe gets a nasty sprain in the cafe and a non-Muslim men want to admin First Aid but the women refused too let him touch her. I think for treatment given by the doctor (another Muslim character and daughter of two other characters) she was suppose to swim but there’s a problem because the only life guard for the women’s exercise class at the pool is male and Muslim women aren’t supposedly suppose to be seen “naked” by men outside of the family. They couldn’t get a woman lifeguard so in the end she ended up wearing a Muslim swimsuit.

Don’t mention it.

We’ve already had plenty of stories where the customers demands to speak to a man and not taking women seriously. Their religion was never mentioned there.

Adding the religion just adds assumptions. OP assumes that he’s a muslim. Then we proceed to assume he’s acting this way because of that. What’s that saying about assumptions? It makes an ass out of u and me

And like Stephen also mentioned, it’s a story that would most likely awaken the trolls

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I concur that it’s irrelevant.

The religion might be completely irrelevant to the misogyny, so it could be a superfluous detail that doesn’t add anything.

I’m sure there are many stories of [presumably] white [presumably] Christian men who are just as sexist, and that wasn’t mentioned in those stories. (Like that lawyer/client one just recently.)

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But the difference with Christan man is anyone on the street can be Christan since we have no national identifying sign for Christianity except for the cross (either with or without Jesus on it) or the fish symbol. Nothing like a Hijab for women or either a Taqiyah or a Kufi caps for men. Or for Sikh -turban and the dagger. Some Orthox Jewish women might wear head covering but not in the same way as Muslim women whom wear hijabs.

Orthodox Jewish men also have pa’ot, payot, or simarem, which are the two long locks just above their ears.

But I should point out that a lot of what we consider to be “Muslim garb” is the standard garb of the Middle East. For instance, Middle-Eastern Christian women often wear hijab because that’s the standard of decency in their area (both culturally and legally, in some cases). Even if a woman isn’t bound by law, she might still wear it to fit in or because she’s used to wearing it and going without feels like nudity. Or because it’s a practical thing to wear in a desert, which is why it was invented by pre-Islamic cultures in the first place. So it’s entirely possible that the guy is a Middle-Eastern Christian or another minority religion.

But the point is that even if you can successfully identify someone as Muslim, is it relevant to the story to point it out? And would it cause anti-Muslim sentiment to publish the story as-is? I think it’s not relevant (quite a few Christian men express the same sentiments) and yes, it would cause anti-Muslim sentiment in the comments (certain people love excuses to complain about Muslims). For both those reasons, it would probably be wise to leave it out.

Granted, I think if you did leave it out, there would be a lot of comments speculating on the family’s religion/ethnicity. That’s happened in the past.

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Yeah I know hijabs are popular Middern Eastern garb for all religions in Middle East. I know Egypt isn’t the Middle East, but I read years ago that a reporter there had talked to a lot of non-Muslims (I think Christans) whom wore something like a hijab

I think the amount of responses and opinions on this on the forum, which is generally more level headed than the comments, shows that if posted the comments are going to be a nightmare I say just skip this one completely.

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Skip. It’s a fairly basic story without any major interesting parts, which is possibly why the whole religious twist was put in.

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To me, the story reads that the reason why the father refuses to speak to the OP is specifically because the OP is female and it’s against his religion.

However, we don’t actually know that for sure: it’s certainly the way the OP presented the story, but for all we know it’s an assumption on the OP’s part which may or may not be erroneous.

I’m not sure there’s a right answer here.

That argument can be made for a LOT of stories on the site, though. “OP assumes the customer/worker is thinking this:” should not get a story removed because we’d lose a LOT of otherwise good anecdotes.